That all important new patient

(pre conference workshop - pre registration essential)

Rosemary Bray
Wednesday 10.00am | 2.00pm
Poolhouse I

From the first communication to signing the contract, what does it take from the entire team to service the new patient at their initial exam? We will discuss the 11 Moments in Time when a patient can make the actual "YES" decision to begin TX.
We will also review the role of the records technician, the support team, the reception team, the TC and the DR in "wowing" the patient. Verbal skills, being prepared and having the right attitude all play into the the patient satisfaction at this most critical appointment.

 

Jedi Mind Tricks for Stress and Happiness

Tony Fernando
Thursday 9.00am
Trinity Room

A session that focuses on how the mind works and "not work". We will look at common mind patterns and how to "trick" the brain to manage stress. Eastern concepts of mindfulness and basic western approaches including CBT will be touched on. Yoda will also have a few words to say.

back to programme

Orthodontic Treatment Planning: my philosophy

Padhraig Fleming
Thursday 10.30am
Trinity Room

An overview of treatment philosophy underlining the importance of clear targets and discussing the relative importance of prioritising both outcomes and process in orthodontic treatment.

back to programme

Waaassuup with good communication

Rosemary Bray
Thursday 10.30am | 1.30pm
Poolhouse I

Print out Handouts for this session

Communicating at all times in an effective, professional manner is most difficult.
Choosing the right words and keeping the proper tone of voice is a gift desired by all, Doctors and Team Members alike.
"Hang on, just, you need to, you should have, waiting room, no problem, I can't, we don't, you guys" . . . merely a few of the used and abused words which we are all guilty of using.
We will explore some of the most common areas of miscommunication and share easy to remember alternatives to assist you in presenting a more polished image of your practice and of yourself!

One that is Professional, Positive, Proactive and Promotional. 

Objectives: Learn 
1- what to say and what not to say
2- how our tone and body language affect the interpretation of our words
3- how to influence people (patients, teams) with our effective communication

back to programme

Management of vertical dimension

M Ali Darendeliler
Thursday 11.15am
Trinity Room 

The most critical point in the management of vertical problems is the diagnosis. The main question is to find out if the vertical problem
is dental or skeletal, what is the vertical position of the upper incisors and lower incisors and the lower facial height.
Based on these features we then should decide how to correct the skeletal or dental or combined discrepancies ?
The best ways of correcting the vertical problems using the most effective mechanics including TADs, orthognathic surgery, sequential aligners and braces will be discussed.

back to programme 

Snapshots of Orthodontic Gnathology: the Facts from the Fiction

Mauro Farella
Thursday 1.30pm
Trinity Room

Orthodontic treatment often follows gnathological principles to achieve an "optimal" or "ideal" occlusion and jaw relationships. Often these concepts are related to function/dysfunction of the masticatory system and are considered as an indication for orthodontic treatment. However, they are no not substantiated by reliable scientific evidence. This is the case also for several claims such as that a good occlusion is important for jaw function and that occlusal anomalies in the form of cross bites or a Class II jaw relationship can be risk factors for temporomandibular disorders. This lecture will review gnathological aspects of orthodontics with an attempt to distinguish the facts from the fiction around the relationship between occlusal anomalies and jaw function or dysfunction and will try to answer several questions. What is a good occlusion? Is a good occlusion important for a proper jaw function? Are the classical gnathological principles still relevant to modern orthodontics? What are the red flags to consider before, during or after orthodontic treatment? The lecture will also address the emerging evidence indicating that the risk of non-adapting to occlusal changes depends more upon neurocognitive aspects than the type or severity of occlusal anomaly.


back to programme

Faster Treatment: getting ahead of ourselves?

Padhraig Fleming
Thursday 2.15pm
Trinity Room

An evidence-based overview of the relative merits of marketed adjuncts and alternatives in terms of expediting orthodontics. The value of proactive planning and mechanics to optimise outcomes without detracting from the process of orthodontics will be discussed.

back to programme

How to present the price in a way that you and your patients love

Dianne Watt
Thursday 4.00pm
Poolhouse I

If you hate discussing the price, then I'm going to show you how to love it! We'll shift our mindset and verbiage away from seeing it as "presenting the price" and replace it with a strategy focused on a conversation that helps get patients started. We'll cover how to create an environment where the patient understands that the price presentation is a discussion to be explored together, not a topic to be embarrassed to ask questions on. I'll help you prevent objections before you get them and show you how to set future appointments for those people who are still undecided. Let's make getting a patient started in treatment an experience that both you and the patient enjoy!

back to programme 

"50 shades of Bray" patient satisfaction to practice success

Rosemary Bray
Friday 8.30am
Trinity Room
Friday 10.30am
Poolhouse I

Print out Handouts for this session

Here it is!! This year celebrates her 50th Anniversary in this Wonderful World of Ortho! Before many of you were born, practices could be considered "successful" merely by producing quality clinical care. Today, the practice that wants to set itself apart from the norm AND be successful has to create an environment where patients get extraordinary care, delivered in the "3 Critical Areas". There are many choices of Ortho practices where patients can go and even if your treatment is the BEST quality available, if the patient does not LIKE YOU, or does not feel their expectations are being at least MET, they can and often will choose another practice. Sadly, they might also forfeit your quality clinical care in making that choice. How great when you can be the practice delivering it all!
Having visited Ortho offices in all 50 states of the USA and many International ones as well, (including Australia and NZ) Rosemary has seen some of the Best of the Best and also some struggling ones who wonder why they don't excel and what more they need to be doing. She will share proven ideas that work to entice you to go home and 1) reinvent yourselves, 2) recommit your team, and 3) reignite your level of patient care.

Learning Objectives: You will learn…
1) Know what things are most critical to continue practice growth, success & prosperity
2) Hear quick "To-Do's" from Rosemary's 50 years of knowledge
3) Understand that many of things that used to work still can and do!

back to programme 

Striving for a Perfect Finish: is it for the patient or the Orthodontist?

Mauro Farella
Friday 10.30am
Trinity Room 

In the last decade, there have been many claims about the so-called 'fast and easy' orthodontic appliances, which have been widely spread through the internet and social media. Unsubstantiated by reliable scientific evidence, these claims are influencing patient expectations and their demand for shorter treatment times. Orthodontic treatment times can be significantly influenced by a multitude of factors. These include patient-specific factors, the need for tooth extraction, specific requirements of finishing and detailing, and many more. Unfortunately, in some cases, non-extraction and 'fast' orthodontic treatment may result in overexpansion of dental arches and compromised orthodontic outcomes. Evaluation of orthodontic outcome is based on assessment of occlusal features and the expectation of long term stability. However, with the exception of anterior alignment, these are hardly perceived by the patients. This raises the question whether a good occlusal result also more stable over time? If so, what occlusal features are most important for long term stability or more relevant to our patients? This lecture will attempt to answer FAQs regarding the importance of finishing and detailing in orthodontics. The role of patient-specific factors for clinical decision-making will also be discussed.

back to programme 

Twin Block: effects and management

Padhraig Fleming
Friday 11.30am
Trinity Room

A personal perspective on the merits of removable functional appliance therapy with an emphasis on improving predictability and compliance with removable appliances.

back to programme   

Adult Orthodontics: not getting it wrong

Padhraig Fleming
Friday 1.30pm
Trinity Room

A case-based presentation outlining the practice and principles underscoring the combined orthodontic-restorative management of  the compromised adult dentition.

back to programme 

Bruxism: an orthodontists' perspective

Mauro Farella
Friday 2.15pm
Trinity Room

Bruxism has been historically associated with malocclusions, occlusal interferences, and in turn, with orthodontics. Nowadays, bruxism is considered a central mechanism, with two distinct manifestations, awake bruxism and sleep bruxism. Awake bruxism, i.e. the habit to clench the teeth during daytime, could simply be a learned habit that increases in frequency and duration under certain conditions, such as stress and anxiety. Sleep bruxism is a 'sleep-related' motor activity that is commonly observed also in non-bruxers. This activity increases in frequency in the presence of some triggers, such as stressors, anxiety, smoking, caffeine intake, heavy alcohol drinking and medications. As the vast majority of bruxing episodes last only a few seconds, the total sleep bruxing time per night amount to a few minutes. This raises the question whether this intermittent and short-lasting muscle activity is sufficient to be so deleterious as normally thought by dentists. But what does an orthodontist need to know about bruxism, and what are the implications of bruxism for the management of orthodontic patients? This lecture will summarise our current understand of bruxism, from an orthodontist's perspective.

back to programme 

Compliance in the Digital Era: Hey Siri, where are my elastics?

Joe Antoun
Friday 1.30pm
Poolhouse I

Compliance is an essential ingredient of any successful orthodontic treatment. Good, consistent adherence to clinical instructions can be challenging however since patients are often required to carry out these tasks (e.g. elastic wear) over lengthy periods of time. Some digital technologies and platforms have already improved our understanding of patient compliance, but can they change it for the better? In this presentation, Joseph will focus on patient compliance patterns; the impact of compliance on treatment duration and outcome; and, the effect of the digital era on compliance with treatment appliances.

back to programme    

OATP update

Tony Lund
Friday 2.30pm
Poolhouse I

Tony will speak on the Orthodontic Auxiliary Training Programme to allay any confusion. In addition, the Orthodontic Auxiliary Training Programme has just been through a reaccreditation with the Dental Council and Tony will discuss the changes.

back to programme   

Orthodontic Retention: not letting go?

Padhraig Fleming
Saturday 9.00am
Trinity Room
An evidence-based overview of the rationale for retention regimes incorporating discussion of the potential application of new technologies to enhance predictability, experiences and compliance.

back to programme 

Management of Trauma in Orthodontics

M Ali Darendeliler
Saturday 9.45am | 11.00am
Trinity Room
It is always challenging to treat cases with ankylosed or missing teeth due to trauma, not only because missing teeth need to be replaced but also trauma mostly causes bone loss and this makes their management difficult especially in young patients. The age limitation for definitive prosthetic replacement makes the management more complex. The potential of orthodontic tooth movement in building bone is not considered enough in every day clinical practice. Management of trauma cases in growing and non-growing patients will be discussed in terms of treatment timing, types of treatment and possibilities. Ankylosis of anterior teeth in early ages due to trauma is also quite frequent and causes, aesthetic, functional, retardation of vertical growth and management problems. A new protocol for alveolar distraction of ankylosed upper incisors which was recently introduced at the University of Sydney will be described and discussed. The ideal treatment options and management will be discussed.

back to programme 

Orthodontic Evidence: problems and some solutions

Padhraig Fleming
Saturday 11.45am
Trinity Room
A discussion of the factors influencing daily decision-making including an overview of the current state of medical, dental and orthodontic evidence with specific reference to recent advances in relation to research focus, reporting and conduct.

back to programme 

 Principal Sponsors

       
               
 
             
 
               

Sponsors

 
               
               

Exhibitors

 
               
               
               
               
               
               
               

 

  • 00

    days

  • 00

    hours

  • 00

    minutes

  • 00

    minutes